Please wait a minute...

Landscape Architecture Frontiers

Landsc. Archit. Front.    2016, Vol. 4 Issue (4) : 131-141
EXPERIMENTS & PROCESSES |
Towards a Visual Voice for Smells
Kate MCLEAN
Senior Lecturer Graphic Design, Canterbury Christ Church University, PhD Candidate Royal College of Art
Download: PDF(1059 KB)  
Export: BibTeX | EndNote | Reference Manager | ProCite | RefWorks
Abstract

Smells are whimsical creatures. As errant hitchhikers of rides on air currents, they appear to defy being tied to a location, yet our nuanced perception of olfactory knowledge is often linked with place.

My work considers smells as entities and speculates on their patterns of movement and their interactions. Smell is under-represented in the Western world. In order to raise awareness about the value of understanding “smell,” my research seeks strategies by which we can share and explore the everyday odours within both local and exotic urban smellscapes.

This article traces the exploration of global cities through the noses of local inhabitants, and uses map-making as a means of communication; whilst also exploring my personal motivation for undertaking this research.

As a graphic designer, I utilise the design process as a methodology; each new piece of work is an iteration on a previous piece.

Smellscape maps use “ex-formation” as a communication design method to render the seemingly “known” as “unknown” so as to encourage discussion and dispute over the possibility of mapping smells and to encourage experiential learning in situ through personal experience. To sniff is to know.

Keywords Smellscape Mapping      Sensory Knowledge      Olfactory Representation      Ex-formation     
Issue Date: 18 September 2016
 Cite this article:   
Kate MCLEAN. Towards a Visual Voice for Smells[J]. Landsc. Archit. Front., 2016, 4(4): 131-141.
 URL:  
http://journal.hep.com.cn/laf/EN/
http://journal.hep.com.cn/laf/EN/Y2016/V4/I4/131
Service
E-mail this article
E-mail Alert
RSS
Articles by authors
Kate MCLEAN
Viewed
Full text


Abstract

Cited

  Shared   
  Discussed