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Landscape Architecture Frontiers

Landsc. Archit. Front.    2018, Vol. 6 Issue (4) : 126-135     https://doi.org/10.15302/J-LAF-20180412
EXPERIMENTS & PROCESSES |
A PLASTIC TIDE: MINING FLOATING PLASTIC WASTE THROUGH LANDSCAPE PROCESSES
Chi-Wai NG()
Rm 1506, Blk 19, Heng Fa Chuen, Chai Wan, Hong Kong, China
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Abstract

The United Nations estimates that 40% of the 300 million tons of plastic produced each year are disposed of within a year. At that rate there could be more plastic than fish in the sea by 2050. Developing countries such as China, Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam contribute up to 60% of the plastics waste drifting in the world’s sea. Much of the plastic is trapped in the South China Sea for two years before drifting out to the Pacific Ocean. The plastic problem has increased as Chinese recyclers have relocated to Southeast Asia and began importing waste from all over the world. The imported plastics are cheap and clean, outcompeting the dirty plastics collected locally from the tides. The recycled plastic price dropped to unprecedented level in 2017, discouraging plastic scavenging by locals. This thesis empowers the waste pickers by designing structures that incentivize plastic recycling. The thesis proposes that the plastic tides can be mined, shredded, cleaned, dried, baked, and cooled in an efficient and holistic landscape system.

Keywords Recycling      Crafting Plastics      Plastic Garbage Patch      Waste Management     
Corresponding Authors: Chi-Wai NG   
Issue Date: 09 October 2018
 Cite this article:   
Chi-Wai NG. A PLASTIC TIDE: MINING FLOATING PLASTIC WASTE THROUGH LANDSCAPE PROCESSES[J]. Landsc. Archit. Front., 2018, 6(4): 126-135.
 URL:  
http://journal.hep.com.cn/laf/EN/10.15302/J-LAF-20180412
http://journal.hep.com.cn/laf/EN/Y2018/V6/I4/126
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