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Landscape Architecture Frontiers

Landsc. Archit. Front.    2020, Vol. 8 Issue (3) : 78-89     https://doi.org/10.15302/J-LAF-1-030015
VIEWS & CRITICISMS
KEEPING PROMISES—HOW TO ATTAIN THE GOAL OF DESIGNING HEALTH-SUPPORTING URBAN GREEN SPACE
Ulrika K. STIGSDOTTER1(), Ulrik SIDENIUS2
1. Professor of Landscape Architecture with Special Responsibilities in Health Design, Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen; Partner of SSC Studio
2. Assistant Professor, Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen; Partner of SSC Studio
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Abstract

Urban green space is attributed a significant role in addressing health challenges associated with urbanization. This is supported by evidence confirming that urban green space may both promote health and well-being and support nature-based treatments. Landscape architects who design to improving health outcomes have an important task; but one which also come with responsibilities. This is also noted by the World Health Organization, which states that it is vital to understand how to design green space so that it actually delivers the intended positive health outcomes. In order to deal with this situation, various tools and design guidelines have been developed by them. However, considered from a designer’s perspective, these tools are seldom expedient enough to apply in the design process, and the guidelines are often not as generalizable as supposed.

In the current article, the authors present a process model for Evidence-Based Health Design in Landscape Architecture (EBHDL) and suggest that it may be useful as a means to deliver on stated health outcomes. The model has been developed over the last 15 years by the research group Nature, Health & Design at the University of Copenhagen. During this period, the model has been constantly enhanced via input evidence from researchers, practitioners, and university students. The EBHDL process model consists of four steps, all of which the landscape architect may be responsible for: Evidence collection, Programming, Designing, and Evaluation.

The model has been applied in the design of the University of Copenhagen’s therapy garden, Nacadia®, and health-promoting forest, Octovia®. Based on encouraging results from research projects, the first step towards a validation of the EBHDL process model have now been made. The benefits of the model include the fact that it is interdisciplinary, systematic, transparent, and dynamic. A weakness of the model is that it is time-consuming, and thereby also costly.

Keywords EBHDL Process Model      Evidence-Based Design      Health Design      Human Health      Landscape Architecture      Nature-Based Solutions     
Corresponding Author(s): Ulrika K. STIGSDOTTER   
Issue Date: 18 August 2020
 Cite this article:   
Ulrika K. STIGSDOTTER,Ulrik SIDENIUS. KEEPING PROMISES—HOW TO ATTAIN THE GOAL OF DESIGNING HEALTH-SUPPORTING URBAN GREEN SPACE[J]. Landsc. Archit. Front., 2020, 8(3): 78-89.
 URL:  
http://journal.hep.com.cn/laf/EN/10.15302/J-LAF-1-030015
http://journal.hep.com.cn/laf/EN/Y2020/V8/I3/78
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Ulrika K. STIGSDOTTER
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