Please wait a minute...

Frontiers of Philosophy in China

Front. Philos. China    2017, Vol. 12 Issue (2) : 224-236     DOI: 10.3868/s030-006-017-0016-0
Orginal Article |
Xujing (Emptiness and Stillness) in Daoism, Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature, and Environmental Ethics
GAO Shan()
Department of Philosophy, School of Political Science and Public Management, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006, China
Download: PDF(265 KB)  
Export: BibTeX | EndNote | Reference Manager | ProCite | RefWorks
Abstract

In this article, I will examine the concept of xujing 虛靜 (emptiness and stillness) in Daoism and its relationship with the aesthetic appreciation of nature and environmental ethics. Firstly, I will examine the Chinese philosophical understanding of nature through the concept of qi. I point out that qi is characterized by four interrelated features, which are emptiness, creativity, vitality, and stillness. Xujing are also aesthetically appreciated as the objective features of qi. Secondly, I will discuss why, as the objective features of qi, xujing are considered to be features that have aesthetic value. I argue that empathy is the reason why emptiness as the objective feature of qi is regarded as having aesthetic value. Thirdly, I will discuss how the aesthetic concept of emptiness helps contribute to the construction of place-based environmental ethics.

Keywords qi      emptiness      stillness      empathy      place      body     
Issue Date: 24 July 2017
 Cite this article:   
GAO Shan. Xujing (Emptiness and Stillness) in Daoism, Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature, and Environmental Ethics[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2017, 12(2): 224-236.
 URL:  
http://journal.hep.com.cn/fpc/EN/10.3868/s030-006-017-0016-0
http://journal.hep.com.cn/fpc/EN/Y2017/V12/I2/224
Service
E-mail this article
E-mail Alert
RSS
Articles by authors
GAO Shan
Related articles from Frontiers Journals
[1] CHENG Lesong. The Symbolism of the Body in Daoism[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2017, 12(1): 54-71.
[2] Thomas Michael, CHEN Yazhou. Approaching Laozi : Comparing a Syncretic Reading to a Synthetic One[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2017, 12(1): 10-25.
[3] Joanna Guzowska. The Spatiality of Cognition in the Zhuangzi[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2015, 10(3): 415-429.
[4] CHEN Guying. The Tradition of Emotive Writing in the Zhuangzi and Its Echoes in Later Generations[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2015, 10(3): 340-352.
[5] Eva Kit Wah Man. A Cross-Cultural Reflection on Shusterman’s Suggestion of the “Transactional” Body[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2015, 10(2): 181-191.
[6] Roger T. Ames. “Bodyheartminding” (Xin 心): Reconceiving the Inner Self and the Outer World in the Language of Holographic Focus and Field[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2015, 10(2): 167-180.
[7] GUO Yi. The Origin and Differentiation of the Theories of Human Nature in Pre-Qin China[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2015, 10(2): 212-238.
[8] Shirley Chan,Daniel Lee. Shendu and Qingdu: Reading the Recovered Bamboo and Silk Manuscripts[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2015, 10(1): 4-20.
[9] CHEN Yun. Bodily Subjectivity, Way of Administration and Governance in the Axial Age[J]. Front Phil Chin, 2013, 8(4): 624-640.
[10] Michael Slote. On Virtue Ethics[J]. Front Phil Chin, 2013, 8(1): 22-30.
[11] James Garrison. On Cheng Chung-Ying’s Bentiyong Onto-hermeneutics[J]. Front Phil Chin, 2012, 7(3): 471-480.
[12] DING Ji. The Manifestation Range of Innately Good Knowledge and Ability, and the Danger of Separation: On Zhuzi’s Question about Understanding Words[J]. Front Phil Chin, 2012, 7(2): 217-243.
[13] LI Chunying. Between Virtues and Blessings: A Discussion on Zhang Jiucheng’s Thoughts[J]. Front Phil Chin, 2012, 7(2): 191-216.
[14] GAO Shan. Can the West Save the East? Intrinsic Value and the Foundation of Chinese Environmental Ethics[J]. Front Phil Chin, 2012, 7(1): 112-127.
[15] CHEN Xiaoping. Various Concepts of “Supervenience” and Their Relations:A Comment on Kim’s Theory of Supervenience[J]. Front Phil Chin, 2011, 6(2): 316-333.
Viewed
Full text


Abstract

Cited

  Shared   
  Discussed