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Frontiers of Philosophy in China

Front. Philos. China    2016, Vol. 11 Issue (3) : 395-414     https://doi.org/10.3868/s030-005-016-0029-4
Orginal Article |
The Invisible and the Secret: Of a Phenomenology of the Inapparent
François Raffoul()
Department of Philosophy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70808, USA
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Abstract

I consider in this article Heidegger’s late characterization of phenomenology as a “phenomenology of the inapparent.” Phenomenology is traditionally considered to be a thought of presence, assigned to a phenomenon that is identified with the present being, or with an object for consciousness. The phenomenon would be synonymous with presence itself, with what manifests itself in a presence. However, I will suggest in the following pages that phenomenology is haunted by the presence of a certain unappearing dimension, a claim that was made by Heidegger in his last seminar in 1973, when he characterized the most proper sense of phenomenology as a “phenomenology of the inapparent.” I attempt to show in what sense for Heidegger the “inapparent” plays in phenomenality and in phenomenology, and to then consider (drawing from Levinas and Derrida) its ethical import.

Keywords phenomenology      presence      invisibility      otherness      secret      responsibility     
Issue Date: 19 September 2016
 Cite this article:   
Fran?ois Raffoul. The Invisible and the Secret: Of a Phenomenology of the Inapparent[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2016, 11(3): 395-414.
 URL:  
http://journal.hep.com.cn/fpc/EN/10.3868/s030-005-016-0029-4
http://journal.hep.com.cn/fpc/EN/Y2016/V11/I3/395
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