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Frontiers of Philosophy in China

Front. Philos. China    2016, Vol. 11 Issue (3) : 338-357     https://doi.org/10.3868/s030-005-016-0026-3
Orginal Article |
Many Healths: Nietzsche and Phenomenologies of Illness
Welsh Talia()
Department of Philosophy & Religion, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, Chattanooga, TN 37405, USA
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Abstract

This paper considers phenomenological descriptions of health in Gadamer, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, and Svenaeus. In these phenomenologies of health, health is understood as a tacit, background state that permits not only normal functioning but also philosophical reflection. Nietzsche’s model of health as a state of intensity that is intimately connected to illness and suffering is then offered as a rejoinder. Nietzsche’s model includes a more complex view of suffering and pain as integrally tied to health, and its language opens up the possibility of many “healths,” providing important theoretical support to phenomenological accounts of the diversity and complexity of health and illness.

Keywords Nietzsche      phenomenology      Heidegger      Merleau-Ponty      health      Gadamer      Svenaeus     
Issue Date: 19 September 2016
 Cite this article:   
Welsh Talia. Many Healths: Nietzsche and Phenomenologies of Illness[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2016, 11(3): 338-357.
 URL:  
http://journal.hep.com.cn/fpc/EN/10.3868/s030-005-016-0026-3
http://journal.hep.com.cn/fpc/EN/Y2016/V11/I3/338
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