Please wait a minute...

Frontiers of Philosophy in China

Front. Philos. China    2015, Vol. 10 Issue (3) : 430-443     https://doi.org/10.3868/s030-004-015-0032-8
research-article |
From Virtue to Freedom through Emotion
Michael Slote()
Department of Philosophy, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33124-4670, USA
Download: PDF(229 KB)  
Export: BibTeX | EndNote | Reference Manager | ProCite | RefWorks
Abstract

Spinoza conceived human freedom as a matter solely of rationality, but an understanding of the role emotion plays in moral virtue can lead one toward viewing emotionality as also essential to human freedom. A large part of human freedom consists in our tendency to give intrinsic importance to people or things outside ourselves and take them into our lives; this sense of importance, in rich and various ways, brings emotion into the center of our lives and our freedom as individuals.

Keywords altruism      egoism      emotion      expansion      freedom      human lives      neutral motives      spontaneity      virtue     
Issue Date: 28 October 2015
 Cite this article:   
Michael Slote. From Virtue to Freedom through Emotion[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2015, 10(3): 430-443.
 URL:  
http://journal.hep.com.cn/fpc/EN/10.3868/s030-004-015-0032-8
http://journal.hep.com.cn/fpc/EN/Y2015/V10/I3/430
Service
E-mail this article
E-mail Alert
RSS
Articles by authors
Michael Slote
Related articles from Frontiers Journals
[1] HUANG Yong. Confucian Ethics: Altruistic? Egoistic? Both? Neither?[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2018, 13(2): 217-231.
[2] Halla Kim. Existential Dimensions of Korean Neo-Confucianism: The Status of Emotions in the Four-Seven Debate[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2017, 12(4): 591-611.
[3] Alicia Hennig. Three Different Approaches to Virtue in Business- Aristotle, Confucius, and Lao Zi[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2016, 11(4): 556-586.
[4] Christopher C. Chrappa. The Incomprehensible Art of Thomas Hobbes[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2016, 11(4): 680-697.
[5] Saulius Geniusas. Max Scheler’s Phenomenology of Pain[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2016, 11(3): 358-376.
[6] Teun Tieleman. The Early Stoics and Aristotelian Ethics[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2016, 11(1): 104-121.
[7] XU Keqian. The Priority of “Liberty” or “Ping An ”: Two Different Cultural Value Priorities and Their Impacts[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2015, 10(4): 579-600.
[8] CHEN Guying. The Tradition of Emotive Writing in the Zhuangzi and Its Echoes in Later Generations[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2015, 10(3): 340-352.
[9] Bongrae Seok. Moral Psychology of Shame in Early Confucian Philosophy[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2015, 10(1): 21-57.
[10] John Lamont. The Consolations of Boethius[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2014, 9(1): 69-86.
[11] Rajesh C. Shukla. Justice and Civic Friendship: An Aristotelian Critique of Modern Citizenry[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2014, 9(1): 1-20.
[12] LU Qiaoying. Aquinas’s Transformation of the Virtue of Courage[J]. Front Phil Chin, 2013, 8(3): 471-484.
[13] LIU Jing. Kant’s Virtue as Strength[J]. Front Phil Chin, 2013, 8(3): 451-470.
[14] WANG Kai. Xunzi: A Paradigm of Rationalistic Virtue Ethics in Early Confucianism[J]. Front Phil Chin, 2013, 8(3): 388-396.
[15] James O. Young. Music and the Representation of Emotion[J]. Front Phil Chin, 2013, 8(2): 332-348.
Viewed
Full text


Abstract

Cited

  Shared   
  Discussed