Please wait a minute...

Frontiers of Philosophy in China

Front. Philos. China    2014, Vol. 9 Issue (2) : 254-267     https://doi.org/10.3868/s030-003-014-0021-0
research-article |
A Philosophical Analysis of the Concept of Crisis
WANG Tangjia()
School of Philosophy, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433, China
Download: PDF(282 KB)  
Export: BibTeX | EndNote | Reference Manager | ProCite | RefWorks
Abstract

In our times, philosophy has been suffering from a spiritual crisis that takes the forms of the crisis of culture, the crisis of meaning, and the crisis of way of life. As the soul of culture, philosophy should contribute valuable responses to the problems of our times. Thus understood, this paper intends to analyze the concept of crisis in a phenomenological approach. The concept of crisis is concerned with the philosophical themes of time and death, and the crises of our times are primarily the crises of life-meaning and the life-world. Drawing sources from Husserl and other phenomenologists, as well as experiences from Chinese culture, I argue that a philosophy of crisis should find its point of departure from the crisis of philosophy.

Keywords crisis      crisis-experience      internal time      phenomenology      Edmund Husserl      Chinese culture     
Issue Date: 04 July 2014
 Cite this article:   
WANG Tangjia. A Philosophical Analysis of the Concept of Crisis[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2014, 9(2): 254-267.
 URL:  
http://journal.hep.com.cn/fpc/EN/10.3868/s030-003-014-0021-0
http://journal.hep.com.cn/fpc/EN/Y2014/V9/I2/254
Service
E-mail this article
E-mail Alert
RSS
Articles by authors
WANG Tangjia
Related articles from Frontiers Journals
[1] Giulio Tononi, Owen Flanagan. Philosophy and Science Dialogue: Consciousness[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2018, 13(3): 332-348.
[2] Hye Young Kim. A Phenomenological Approach to the Korean “We”: A Study in Social Intentionality[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2017, 12(4): 612-632.
[3] Patricia Huntington. Place as Refuge: Exploring the Poetical Legacy of Matsuo Bashō[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2017, 12(4): 572-590.
[4] YANG Tongjin. Is There an Identity Crisis in Environmental Ethics?[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2017, 12(2): 195-206.
[5] Frank Schalow. A Diltheyan Loop? The Methodological Side of Heidegger’s Kant-Interpretation[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2016, 11(3): 377-394.
[6] Saulius Geniusas. Max Scheler’s Phenomenology of Pain[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2016, 11(3): 358-376.
[7] Welsh Talia. Many Healths: Nietzsche and Phenomenologies of Illness[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2016, 11(3): 338-357.
[8] Tara Kennedy. The Ethics of Treating Animals as Resources: A Post-Heideggerian Approach[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2016, 11(3): 463-482.
[9] Megan Altman. Heidegger on the Struggle for Belongingness and Being at Home[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2016, 11(3): 444-462.
[10] JIN Xiping. Heidegger’s Conception of Being-with (Mitsein ) and His Simple Designation of Social and Political Reality in the Black Notebooks[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2016, 11(3): 415-429.
[11] François Raffoul. The Invisible and the Secret: Of a Phenomenology of the Inapparent[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2016, 11(3): 395-414.
[12] Evangelos D. Protopapadakis. Environmental Ethics and Linkola’s Ecofascism: An Ethics Beyond Humanism[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2014, 9(4): 586-601.
[13] Tom Rockmore. Marx and the Transition Problem[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2014, 9(3): 342-349.
[14] David Schweickart. The Next American Revolution? Reflections on Gar Alperovitz, What Then Must We Do?[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2014, 9(3): 350-357.
[15] Oliver Davies. Religion, Politics and Ethics: Towards a Global Theory of Social Transformation[J]. Front Phil Chin, 2012, 7(4): 572-597.
Viewed
Full text


Abstract

Cited

  Shared   
  Discussed