Please wait a minute...

Frontiers of Philosophy in China

Front Phil Chin    2010, Vol. 5 Issue (4) : 560-574     https://doi.org/10.1007/s11466-010-0115-1
research-article |
The Significance of Xuwu 虚无 (Nothingness) in Chinese Aesthetics
FAN Minghua()
School of Philosophy, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, China
Download: PDF(718 KB)   HTML
Export: BibTeX | EndNote | Reference Manager | ProCite | RefWorks
Abstract

Just as nothingness is a fundamental concept in Daoist philosophy, it is also a fundamental concept in Chinese aesthetics, where it has multiple meanings: First, nothingness, as a reaction against unaesthetic psychical activity, is a primary precondition of aesthetic and artistic activity. Second, as the void or intangible “stuff” juxtaposed to “substance,” it is an indispensable compositional property of artworks as well as an essential condition for the manifestation of an artistic form. Finally, as a reaction against the unaesthetic world of daily life—the experiential world—nothingness is the fundamental basis and essential provision for establishing an artistic world.

Keywords Daoism      nothingness      aesthetic      art      aesthetics     
Corresponding Authors: FAN Minghua,Email:fmh6191@sina.com   
Issue Date: 05 December 2010
 Cite this article:   
FAN Minghua. The Significance of Xuwu 虚无 (Nothingness) in Chinese Aesthetics[J]. Front Phil Chin, 2010, 5(4): 560-574.
 URL:  
http://journal.hep.com.cn/fpc/EN/10.1007/s11466-010-0115-1
http://journal.hep.com.cn/fpc/EN/Y2010/V5/I4/560
Service
E-mail this article
E-mail Alert
RSS
Articles by authors
FAN Minghua
Related articles from Frontiers Journals
[1] CAI Weixin. Causal Exclusion and Causal Autonomism[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2018, 13(3): 402-419.
[2] LIU Yuedi. From “Practice” to “Living”: Main Trends of Chinese Aesthetics in the Past 40 Years[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2018, 13(1): 139-149.
[3] Selusi Ambrogio. Mou Zongsan and Martin Heidegger: Reopening a Debate on Ontology and Ethics[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2018, 13(1): 55-71.
[4] Patricia Huntington. Place as Refuge: Exploring the Poetical Legacy of Matsuo Bashō[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2017, 12(4): 572-590.
[5] Mario Wenning. Mysticism and Peace of Mind: Reflections on Tugendhat and Daoism[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2017, 12(4): 554-571.
[6] ZHENG Kai. Ontology and Metaphysics in Chinese Philosophy[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2017, 12(3): 408-428.
[7] WANG Tao. Was John Stuart Mill a Pluralist?[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2017, 12(2): 278-294.
[8] Bo R. Meinertsen. Towards Gratitude to Nature: Global Environmental Ethics for China and the World[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2017, 12(2): 207-223.
[9] Jos de Mul. The Earth Garden: Going Back or Going Forward to Nature?[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2017, 12(2): 237-248.
[10] ZHANG Weite. Descartes’ Metaphysical Doubts about Clear and Distinct Perception[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2017, 12(1): 151-181.
[11] JeeLoo Liu. The B-Theory of Time and the Notion of Change in the Yijing[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2017, 12(1): 72-89.
[12] CHENG Lesong. The Symbolism of the Body in Daoism[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2017, 12(1): 54-71.
[13] David Chai. Ji Kang on Nourishing Life[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2017, 12(1): 38-53.
[14] Thomas Michael, CHEN Yazhou. Approaching Laozi : Comparing a Syncretic Reading to a Synthetic One[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2017, 12(1): 10-25.
[15] Alicia Hennig. Three Different Approaches to Virtue in Business- Aristotle, Confucius, and Lao Zi[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2016, 11(4): 556-586.
Viewed
Full text


Abstract

Cited

  Shared   
  Discussed