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Frontiers of Literary Studies in China

Front Liter Stud Chin    2012, Vol. 6 Issue (2) : 184-197     https://doi.org/10.3868/s010-001-012-0011-1
research-article |
Woman, Sacrifice, and the Limits of Sympathy
Haiyan Lee()
The Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-2000, USA
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Abstract

In both Lu Xun’s “The New Year’s Sacrifice” (1924) and Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery” (1948), a woman is made a sacrificial victim by her village community, one symbolically and one literally. Using the two stories as my cross-cultural examples, I ponder the connection between the failure of sympathy and patriarchal sacrificial logic, and ask what literature can do to help create the condition of possibility for moral agency.

Keywords sympathy      empathy      moral agency      literature      woman      Lu Xun      Shirley Jackson     
Corresponding Authors: Haiyan Lee,Email:haiyan@stanford.edu   
Issue Date: 05 June 2012
 Cite this article:   
Haiyan Lee. Woman, Sacrifice, and the Limits of Sympathy[J]. Front Liter Stud Chin, 2012, 6(2): 184-197.
 URL:  
http://journal.hep.com.cn/flsc/EN/10.3868/s010-001-012-0011-1
http://journal.hep.com.cn/flsc/EN/Y2012/V6/I2/184
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