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Frontiers of Literary Studies in China

Front Liter Stud Chin    2012, Vol. 6 Issue (1) : 56-77     https://doi.org/10.3868/s010-001-012-0005-2
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Sisterhood at the Nexus of Love and Revolution: Coming-of-Age Narratives on Both Sides of the Cold War
Krista Van Fleit Hang()
The Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA
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Abstract

This article examines the similarities between Song of Youth and The Best of Everything, coming-of-age novels published in China and the United States in 1958. The author finds that comparable narrative structures reveal parallels in two societies that are often viewed in stark contrast. In both novels, a feminist ideal of sisterhood is woven into the coming-of-age stories of young women moving into society, and in each novel, the social background of the times determines the degree to which mainstream values are conducive to imagining a public sphere that is welcoming to women.

Keywords revolution      feminism      popular fiction      American literature      Chinese literature      Yang Mo      Rona Jaffe      coming-of-age novel     
Corresponding Authors: Krista Van Fleit Hang,Email:hangk@mailbox.sc.edu   
Issue Date: 05 March 2012
 Cite this article:   
Krista Van Fleit Hang. Sisterhood at the Nexus of Love and Revolution: Coming-of-Age Narratives on Both Sides of the Cold War[J]. Front Liter Stud Chin, 2012, 6(1): 56-77.
 URL:  
http://journal.hep.com.cn/flsc/EN/10.3868/s010-001-012-0005-2
http://journal.hep.com.cn/flsc/EN/Y2012/V6/I1/56
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