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Frontiers of Philosophy in China

Front. Philos. China    2010, Vol. 5 Issue (2) : 196-211     https://doi.org/10.1007/s11466-010-0011-8
Research articles
The Advantages, Shortcomings, and Existential Issues of Zhuangzi’s Use of Images
BAO Zhaohui,
ISchool of Liberal Arts, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, China;
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Abstract Zhuangzi is considered a creative poet-philosopher because of his use of imaginative images. He used the imaginative images of his system to construct the world of the Dao. He left the essence of material things as they are to speak for the mystery of existence itself, and let them express both the state of and the dream for human freedom. Zhuangzi’s way of using images shows his own lack of the understanding about images, and his lack of adequate assessments. He used images in accord with his own personal preferences and fixed characteristics. He also had a tendency to equate the Dao which he experienced in his mind with the Dao itself. These shortcomings limit his improving and understanding of the Dao, so that his Dao failed to become more open to a wider existence.
Keywords Zhuangzi      image      natural images      imaginative images      Dao which is experienced in one’s heart      
Issue Date: 05 June 2010
 Cite this article:   
BAO Zhaohui. The Advantages, Shortcomings, and Existential Issues of Zhuangzi’s Use of Images[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2010, 5(2): 196-211.
 URL:  
http://journal.hep.com.cn/fpc/EN/10.1007/s11466-010-0011-8
http://journal.hep.com.cn/fpc/EN/Y2010/V5/I2/196
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