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Frontiers of Economics in China

Front. Econ. China    2016, Vol. 11 Issue (2) : 196-209     DOI: 10.3868/s060-005-016-0013-6
Orginal Article |
The Possibility and Approaches to an Upper Middle Growth Rate
Jiwei Lou
Ministry of Finance of the People’s Republic of China, Beijing 100820, China
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Abstract

This article discusses the challenges facing China’s economy and assesses the likelihood of China falling into the “middle-income trap.” In the view of this author, an upper middle growth rate of 6.5% to 7% can be achieved if China undertakes further economic reforms in the areas of agriculture, household registration system, urbanization and social insurance system.

Keywords middle-income trap      wage      economic growth      China     
Issue Date: 08 June 2016
 Cite this article:   
Jiwei Lou. The Possibility and Approaches to an Upper Middle Growth Rate[J]. Front. Econ. China, 2016, 11(2): 196-209.
 URL:  
http://journal.hep.com.cn/fec/EN/10.3868/s060-005-016-0013-6
http://journal.hep.com.cn/fec/EN/Y2016/V11/I2/196
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