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Landscape Architecture Frontiers

Landsc. Archit. Front.    2016, Vol. 4 Issue (3) : 10-21
research-article |
The Effect of Landscape Patterns on Avian Communities during Summer Months in Beijing’s Urban Parks
Shilin XIE1,Fei LU2,Lei CAO3,Weiqi ZHOU4,Zhiyun OUYANG5
1. Joint Training Graduate Student, University of Science and Technology of China and the Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences
2. Associate Researcher at State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology of the Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences
3. Researcher at State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology of the Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences
4. Researcher at State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology of the Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences
5. Researcher at State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology of the Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Associate Director of the Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences
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Abstract

Parks are among the most important green spaces in urban landscapes, making them hotspots for urban biodiversity research. The scale and spatial patterns of these urban landscapes suggest best practices for avian communities. This study considers the landscape patterns of Beijing’s urban parks and their relationship to avian species abundance and density. The study analyzed high-resolution satellite images, with an accuracy of one meter, from 29 urban parks during the summer months. The research showed the average size of Beijing’s urban parks to be small (with an average size of 13.9 hm2), with woodland landscapes as the most common landscape typology (with an average of 74.7%). In the analyzed parks, the patch density was high, with an average density of 8.63 per hectare, while the contagion index was low, with a 63 on average. Additionally, the number of avian species found in each sample park was low, with only 13.2 recorded on average. Spearman correlation analysis showed that avian species abundance were positively correlated with park areas, along with the landscape contagion and the proportion of woodland landscape, and negatively correlated with patch density, SHDI, and SHEI. Finally, the analysis showed a correlation between small patch size and low species diversity. The conclusions drawn can help provide guidance and reference for avian urban park planning and design.

Keywords Urban Park      Landscape Pattern      Avian Community      Biodiversity      Landscape Design      Beijing     
Issue Date: 13 July 2016
 Cite this article:   
Shilin XIE,Fei LU,Lei CAO, et al. The Effect of Landscape Patterns on Avian Communities during Summer Months in Beijing’s Urban Parks[J]. Landsc. Archit. Front., 2016, 4(3): 10-21.
 URL:  
http://journal.hep.com.cn/laf/EN/
http://journal.hep.com.cn/laf/EN/Y2016/V4/I3/10
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Shilin XIE
Fei LU
Lei CAO
Weiqi ZHOU
Zhiyun OUYANG
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