Please wait a minute...

Frontiers of Philosophy in China

Front. Philos. China    2019, Vol. 14 Issue (4) : 552-569     https://doi.org/10.3868/s030-008-019-0033-1
SPECIAL THEME
On Interpretations of Heidegger’s Black Notebooks from the Viewpoint of Academic Micro-Politics
LIU Yu-Chao1(), TSAI Wei-Ding2
1. Department of Philosophy, National Chengchi University, Taipei 11623, Taiwan, China
2. Department of Philosophy, National Chengchi University, Taipei 11623, Taiwan, China
Download: PDF(312 KB)  
Export: BibTeX | EndNote | Reference Manager | ProCite | RefWorks
Abstract

This article is to explore the micro-political situation behind interpretations of Heidegger’s Black Notebooks in the academic context. In order to show a whole and complete picture, this article first presents a detailed description of the publication information of the Black Notebooks and of the debates about anti-Semitism that arose after their publication in the West. Then we try to compare the interpretations of the Black Notebooks most prevalent in the West with those in Chinese academia, in order to delineate their different tendencies in interpretations. Finally, by comparison of distinctive tendencies from both sides, we find out that there are already academic micro-political attitudes guiding these varying interpretations of Heidegger’s Black Notebooks.

Keywords Heidegger      Black Notebooks      anti-Semitism      Nazi      academic micro-politics     
Issue Date: 06 January 2020
 Cite this article:   
LIU Yu-Chao,TSAI Wei-Ding. On Interpretations of Heidegger’s Black Notebooks from the Viewpoint of Academic Micro-Politics[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2019, 14(4): 552-569.
 URL:  
http://journal.hep.com.cn/fpc/EN/10.3868/s030-008-019-0033-1
http://journal.hep.com.cn/fpc/EN/Y2019/V14/I4/552
Service
E-mail this article
E-mail Alert
RSS
Articles by authors
LIU Yu-Chao
TSAI Wei-Ding
Related articles from Frontiers Journals
[1] Jean-Yves Heurtebise. Is Heidegger an Orientalist or an Occidentalist European Philosopher? Disclosing the Political Factor behind Heidegger’s Representation of Chinese Thinking[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2019, 14(4): 523-551.
[2] Selusi Ambrogio. Mou Zongsan and Martin Heidegger: Reopening a Debate on Ontology and Ethics[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2018, 13(1): 55-71.
[3] KE Xiaogang. Reason and Besinnung: Heidegger’s Reflections on Science in Contributions to Philosophy [J]. Front. Philos. China, 2016, 11(3): 430-443.
[4] Tara Kennedy. The Ethics of Treating Animals as Resources: A Post-Heideggerian Approach[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2016, 11(3): 463-482.
[5] David Chai. On Pillowing One’s Skull: Zhuangzi and Heidegger on Death[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2016, 11(3): 483-500.
[6] Megan Altman. Heidegger on the Struggle for Belongingness and Being at Home[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2016, 11(3): 444-462.
[7] JIN Xiping. Heidegger’s Conception of Being-with (Mitsein ) and His Simple Designation of Social and Political Reality in the Black Notebooks[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2016, 11(3): 415-429.
[8] Welsh Talia. Many Healths: Nietzsche and Phenomenologies of Illness[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2016, 11(3): 338-357.
[9] ZHANG Xianglong. A temporal analysis of the consciousness of filial piety[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2007, 2(3): 309-335.
Viewed
Full text


Abstract

Cited

  Shared   
  Discussed