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Frontiers of Engineering Management

Front. Eng    2016, Vol. 3 Issue (3) : 231-238     https://doi.org/10.15302/J-FEM-2016032
ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT THEORIES AND METHODOLOGIES |
Improving Internationally Core Competences Based on the Capabilities of Precise and Accurate Project Management
Zhen-you Li1(),Ji-shan He2,Meng-jun Wang3
1. China NERIN Engineering Co. Ltd., Nanchang 330031, China
2. Business School, Central South University, Changsha 410083, China
3. School of Civil Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083, China
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Abstract

Modern international project management has entered the phase of precise and accurate project management after the global financial crisis broke out at the beginning of the 21st century. However, its development has faced new challenges since there has been lack of explicitly unanimous definition for the capability dimensions of precise and accurate project management, as well as the models and their process control parameters. The required core capabilities based on the precise and accurate project management for various rings are involved in the project life cycle, namely, the required internationally core competences and their components for the phases of project strategic planning and decision making in the early project phase, as well as the value engineering, and the project supervision and controls during the execution phase. Through studying the effects of the internationally core competences based on precise and accurate project management capabilities for the success and excellence of projects and configuring such models, the goal is to help the main contractors continuously obtain project success and excellence, thus improve its internationally core competences with continuous project success and excellence.

Keywords precise and accurate project management      project strategic planning      decision-making      project supervision and controls      project execution      value engineering     
Corresponding Authors: Zhen-you Li   
Online First Date: 21 November 2016    Issue Date: 22 December 2016
 Cite this article:   
Zhen-you Li,Ji-shan He,Meng-jun Wang. Improving Internationally Core Competences Based on the Capabilities of Precise and Accurate Project Management[J]. Front. Eng, 2016, 3(3): 231-238.
 URL:  
http://journal.hep.com.cn/fem/EN/10.15302/J-FEM-2016032
http://journal.hep.com.cn/fem/EN/Y2016/V3/I3/231
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Zhen-you Li
Ji-shan He
Meng-jun Wang
Index category Sub-index A=Weight (%) B= Scoring Score C= A×B
1. Strategic risk decision making capability 1.1 Capability of determining the project management model 8 0?100 0?8
1.2 Capability of obtaining contract 9 0?100 0?8
1.3 Capability of predicting project efforts 8 0?100 0?8
2. Financial risk decision-making capability 2.1 Capability of estimating the amount of project financing 8 0?100 0?8
2.2 Capability of predicting systemic risk 8 0?100 0?8
2.3 Capability of obtaining reliable cost estimate basis 9 0?100 0?8
3. Operational risk decision-making capability 3.1 Sub-contract planning capabilities 9 0?100 0?8
3.2 Capability of computing total expected returns 8 0?100 0?8
3.3 Capability of computing total expected risks 8 0?100 0?8
4. Hazard risk decision-making capability 4.1 Capability of determining the risk analysis methods 8 0?100 0?8
4.2 Capability of identifying hazard process 8 0?100 0?8
4.3 Capability of potential process hazard management 9 0?100 0?8
Total Score 100 0?100 0?100
Tab.1  Main Contractor Strategic Planning and Decision-Making Capability Ratings in the Project Early Stages for the Project Life Cycle
Index category Sub-index A=Weight (%) B= Scoring Score C= A×B
1. Progress monitoring and control capabilities 1.1 Capability of scheduling 5 0?100 0?5
1.2 Capability of assessing progress 5 0?100 0?5
1.3 Capability of controlling progress 6 0?100 0?6
2. Costs monitoring and control capabilities 2.1 Capability of cost planning 5 0?100 0?5
2.2 Capability of assessing costs 5 0?100 0?5
2.3 Capability of controlling costs 6 0?100 0?6
3. Quality monitoring and control capabilities 3.1 Capability of quality planning 6 0?100 0?6
3.2 Capability of assessing quality 6 0?100 0?6
3.3 Capability of controlling quality 6 0?100 0?6
4. HSEC monitoring and control capabilities 4.1 Capability of HSEC planning 6 0?100 0?6
4.2 Capability of assessing HSEC 6 0?100 0?6
4.3 Capability of controlling HSEC 6 0?100 0?6
5. Contracts monitoring and control capabilities 5.1 Capability of contract planning 5 0?100 0?5
5.2 Capability of assessing contracts 5 0?100 0?5
5.3 Capability of controlling contracts 6 0?100 0?6
6. Information and document monitoring and control capabilities 6.1 Capability of information and documents planning 5 0?100 0?5
6.2 Capability of assessing information and documents 5 0?100 0?5
6.3 Capability of controlling information and documents 6 0?100 0?6
Total score 100 0?100 0?100
Tab.2  Ratings on Monitoring and Control Capabilities for Main Contractors in the Project Life Cycle
Index category Sub-index A=Weight (%) B= Scoring Score C= A×B
1. Engineering design implementation of optimization capabilities 1.1 Engineering design implementation capacity 7 0?100 0?7
1.2 Value engineering capacity 7 0?100 0?7
1.3 Engineering design coordination capacity 6 0?100 0?6
2. Procurement implementation of optimization capabilities 2.1 Procurement implementation capacity 7 0?100 0?7
2.2 Procurement optimization capacity 7 0?100 0?7
2.3 Procurement coordination capacity 6 0?100 0?6
3. Construction implementation of optimization capabilities 3.1 Construction implementation capacity 7 0?100 0?7
3.2 Construction optimization capacity 7 0?100 0?7
3.3 Construction coordination capacity 6 0?100 0?6
4. Commissioning and acceptance implementation of optimization capabilities 4.1 Commissioning and acceptance implementation capacity 7 0?100 0?7
4.2 Commissioning and acceptance optimization capacity 7 0?100 0?7
4.3 Commissioning and acceptance coordination capacity 6 0?100 0?6
5. Production preparation implementation of optimization capabilities 5.1 Production preparation implementation capacity 7 0?100 0?7
5.2 Production preparation optimization capacity 7 0?100 0?7
5.3 Production preparation coordination capacity 6 0?100 0?6
Total score 100 0?100 0?100
Tab.3  Main Contractor Implementation and Optimization Capabilities Ratings in Project Management Life Cycle
Internationally core competitiveness A=Weight (%) B=Scoring Capacity ratings C=∑(Ai×Bi), total score Evaluated scores by using IPMA-PEB-1.0
Planning and decision-making 40 0?100 0?100
Monitoring and control 30 0?100
Implementation and optimization 30 0?100
Tab.4  The Relationship of Internationally Core Competitiveness and Performance Based on Precise and Accurate Project Management of Main Contractors
Annually Total revenues for Overseas projects (USD) Growth rate of revenues for overseas projects (%) The new contract number of overseas projects (USD) The new contract growth rate of overseas projects (%) Total profits for overseas projects (USD) Growth rate of profits for overseas projects (%)
0th A1 NA A3 NA A5 NA
1st B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6
2nd C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6
3rd D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6
Tab.5  Three Internationally Core Competitiveness Category Indicators of the Main Contractor for Three Consecutive Years
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